Are Felt Picks Any Good?

Bolo Pick Felt Pick Comparison Test
Amazon Pick Review

Hello! In today's video and blog post we will be discussing the Bolo Felt Picks that my student, Sophia, gave me last week. The picks came with her ukulele as a package deal and she said she wanted to learn how to play with her hand first and later transition to the pick. I like that idea, so I took the gift :) 
The picks are also sold separately online. If you would like to check these out, I have provided some links below.
According to Amazon USA the picks are approximately $7. There are 6 felt picks in each package.

In my channel, we had previously made 3 felt picks (I have added this video at the bottom of this blog post). Those picks were inspired by the felt picks I had seen floating around Amazon. We made 3 different felt picks, all from items that can be found lying around your home or office. The DIY felt picks were extremely affordable to make  and I ended up offering them to kids who had blisters from strumming too hard. 
I think I will always have a stash of DIY felt picks in my classroom for students who get injured or have sensitive hands (everyone's skin is different). I like that the felt picks are pretty much free, as our school has a supply of felt in the teacher's supply room, and that I would not be heartbroken if they were destroyed by the kids. Let's face it- kids have a way of destroying things pretty quickly. 

If you're a music teacher like me, you've had students ask you if they can use a pick while playing the ukulele. If you are a picky person like me, you probably responded with something like, "I'm sorry, but plastic picks damage the top of the ukuleles, so please use your hand to strum. As a people-pleaser it sucks to say no to my kids, especially when they want to try something new. Now that I know about the felt picks, I will be able to give students an option. They can use a pick on the classroom ukuleles IF, and only if, they provide their own felt picks.

I will send interested students to my DIY video (shown below) and to the review video above so that they can make their own choice.
Teachers might relate to this: in the classroom you have to pick and choose your battles. There are times when you have to compromise. Of course I prefer students to learn how to play with their hands first, but if the student persists, now I have some alternatives.


















































































Bernadette Etcheverry. Powered by Blogger.